Biography

Malesha Jessie Taylor is a classically-trained, vocal artist whose work spans from traditional opera to jazz, world and experimental. A native Southern Californian, her engagements include featured performances with the Boston Pops Orchestra, American Symphony Orchestra, Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, Pacific Symphony Orchestra, among others. Mrs. Taylor sang with Los Angeles Opera covering the role of Tebaldo in Don Carlo and Javotte in Manon. She made her debut with the company as Annie in Porgy and Bess and followed as Cercatrice in William Friedkin and Woody Allen's production of Il Trittico: Suor Angelica. She also played the role of Annie in Porgy and Bess in the Francesca Zambello’s filmed production with San Francisco Opera, as seen on PBS. While on the east coast, Malesha staged impromptu performances in bodegas, laundromats, buses and barbershops in Brooklyn, NY.  Her performances and the resulting interactions with spectators, collectively named Guerrilla Opera, were apart of the exhibition, Cultural Fluency: Engagements with Contemporary Brooklyn at BRIC (Brooklyn Information and Culture) and shown again at the Museum of Man San Diego in 2016. Additional engagements include, the radio opera Invisible People, composed by sound designer/composer, Yvette Jackson of UCSD and the #SchoolsNotPrisons concert tour funded by the California Endowment.  This past summer, Malesha debuted and self-produced the project, I, Too, Sing America, a recital and conversation piece named after the famed poem by Langston Hughes.  The recital includes arts songs set to Hughes’ poetry by Composer/Professor Richard Thompson.  Malesha holds a Master of Music degree from the University of Southern California and is the Founder of museSalon Collaborative, a non-profit consultancy working at the nexus of social change and the arts. Malesha is currently engaged with the San Diego Opera and teaches voice at San Diego Community College, Grossmont College.

 

 

The function of art is to do more than tell it like it is, it’s to imagine what is possible.
— bell hooks